Big Bee is Dead

Thank you City of Calgary Councillors, and thank you 70.71% of Calgarians. You have single-handedly managed to decimate the bee population in my yard from about 20 bees down to 4. Way to Go! You must be so proud of yourself, standing before the world and watching those nasty weeds wither away, along with those dead bees. Congratulations.

I’ve been wondering what happened to Big Bee! He hasn’t been around my Delphiniums for a few days. Coincidentally, the green space behind my yard, the nearby soccer field, and surrounding beds near the children’s playground were sprayed with Trillion, 2-4-D, and Vantage.

You know what those pesticides do to bees?

This.

 

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Dead Big Bee – July 28, 2015

Fact Sheet on Trillion: http://www.flora.org/healthyottawa/trillion.htm

To save you the trouble of reading the whole article on this, Calgary people, let me summarize some of it for you here:

“Humans are much more heavily contaminated with 2,4-DCP than with 2,4-D. 2,4-DCP is considered a possible carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).”

“A study in the peer-reviewed journal “Environmental Health Perspectives”, noted that the commercial, off-the-shelf mixture of 2,4-D, Dicamba and Mecoprop may pose serious reproductive risks.”

“2,4-D, was recently found to be persuasively linked to cancers, neurological diseases and reproductive problems (Sears et al., Paediatrics and Child Health, April 2006). Since then, very recent research greatly strengthened the scientific links between non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and 2,4-D.”

See you in the Cancer Ward, you idiots.

Not a Happy Bee today.

😦

Sunny Stonecrops for Sumptious Suppers

Hello Bee Friends,

How is your garden? Mine is full of Stonecrops blooming profusely and brightening up my whole yard. Stonecrops are wonderful plants because they love hot and dry, and that’s exactly what I have in my backyard. They are so pretty, bloom all summer, and are exceptionally easy to grow. This plant has grown everywhere I’ve planted it – in rich moist soil, in dry hot baked clay, in cracks between slate stepping stones, under other plants and in full sun.

And, most wonderful of all, this plant is loved not just by me, but by almost any living creature that visits my yard.

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Yesterday I counted one white moth, Β one orange moth, three mid-size bees, one big bee, one wasp, several flying insects too quick and small to know what they were, and several ants all enjoying the yellow Stonecrop (Sedum Kamtschaticum) in the warm sunset – and all at the same time.Β 

Bee enjoying Stonecrop (Sedum) July 10, 2015

Even the furry cat I am currently kitty-sitting this week loves to sit beside it, listening to the buzz of the bees. πŸ˜€

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Everybody loves Stonecrop

I have four different Stonecrops, but this particular variety of Stonecrop is the favourite of all. It propagates easily from cuttings just by plucking off a shoot and sticking it directly in the ground. It can also be grown from the seed it produces after flowering. It grows everywhere it is planted. It blooms from late spring to autumn, changing colour from this bright sunny yellow to a bronzy-orange, and finally to red. The leaves change colour too in the autumn. It contains itself well in a showy clump with the height ranging between 4-10 inches.

If you can only afford to plant one or two plants, I would highly recommend this one. Especially for a starting gardener as it is so easy to grow and looks beautiful all spring, summer and autumn. Bees love it, butterflies love it – Everybody loves Stonecrop! πŸ˜€

Do you have any Stonecrops growing in your garden?

Have a nice week, and Bee Nice to Bees! πŸ˜€